Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 483 8 3 8 I n just over one century, the US population has grown six-fold, and continued the radical shift to an overwhelmingly urban populace. From the early 20th century, US industrial production began its steep rise, picking up pace during the buildup of the US military-industrial complex and continuing its strong growth building consumer goods, providing infrastructure needs for residential power and personal transportation. During this timeframe the country built strong industries in chemicals, pharmaceuticals, automobiles, foodstuffs and beverages, all of which required a strong and innovative filtration and separations industry. US government spending has grown at a pace to match the Population and Industrial Production, and GDP. In many cases, government spending on research drives industrial growth and advances in healthcare and life sciences, both heavy users of filtration technology and porous media. 1. US POPULATION 150 Million, >36% rural 2. PRODUCTION INDEX — 18 3. US GDP $294 Billion 4. US Public Health Standards apply to states 5. Flocculation and media filters in addition to sand, and now carbon used for taste and odor reduction 6. Oil, fuel and air filters used on automobiles 7. Many industrial processes using filtration 1. US POPULATION 100 Million, >50% rural 2. PRODUCTION INDEX — 7 3. US GDP $88 Billion 4. US Public Health Service sets water saftey standards on boats and trains 5. Sand filters and chlorination used to purify water 6. Oil filters used on automobiles US Filtration Industry Follows Global Mega Trends 1920 1950 Filtration and Separation Industry Growth Rate Outpaces Both Population and GDP