Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 483 7 3 7 I t can be correlated that population growth and urbanization lead to infrastructure development and the growth of industrial capacity. Municipal governments in the US and Europe, in the late 1800s and early 1900s, propelled two important environmental and public health developments: air pollution control and water/wastewater treatment. In both instances, the concentration of people, workplaces and transportation needs led municipal governments to approach these problems as public health issues. Looking at the rapid development of the filtration and separation industry over the last century, it is clearly a response to growing population and urbanization. These trends drive the need for a larger and safer food supply, and industrial processes that provide goods and services for a larger and wealthier population. A Global Force for Good